Medicare Advantage (Part C), a privately offered alternative to Original Medicare (Parts A and B), has grown in popularity over the years. In 1999, 18% of Medicare enrollees chose a Medicare Advantage plan rather than Original Medicare. By 2018, 34% of Medicare enrollees were using Medicare Advantage. Medicare Advantage plans vary in popularity by location, with enrollment rates tending to be highest in or near coastal states and lowest in the center of the country. In some cases, low enrollment rates may reflect fewer plan options in a state. However, on average, seniors have more Medicare Advantage options than ever before. 

Despite the growing popularity of Medicare Advantage, some seniors face obstacles that prevent them from truly understanding how it works and who it benefits. 

Common mistakes about Medicare Advantage include misunderstanding its differences from Original Medicare, getting it confused with other forms of private Medicare insurance (like Medigap or Part D), or not understanding how to look up or evaluate plans. As you navigate your Medicare choices, you’ll likely receive advertisements for Medicare Advantage plans in the mail. And you’ll also probably see numerous news articles about the insurance companies involved in the market. Sifting through all the available information can be daunting.

If you’re considering switching to Medicare Advantage but want to learn more before taking action, this information can provide some clarity about many facets of Medicare Advantage. To learn about eligibility and enrollment, costs, coverage, plan types, and more… Continue Reading.

Source: Paying for Senior Care